Virtual Tours

Experience the Elbphilharmonie and the Laeiszhalle from your couch!

The Elbphilharmonie and the Laeiszhalle have been completely empty for a couple of weeks now – and that also means an end to our popular guided tours through the Elbphilharmonie for the time being. We are now offering virtual tours instead, enabling people to experience the Elbphilharmonie and the Laeiszhalle from their couch. Our guides show the most interesting parts of the buildings.

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The Elbphilharmonie – All the episodes

  • 01. The roof terrace

    Our guide Yolanda shows the Elbphilharmonie's roof terrace, the so-called Sky Lounge, and presents the unique view over the building's different roofs.

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  • 02. The window profiles

    Our virtual tour continues in the foyer of the Grand Hall, where you have the best vantage point for looking at and through one of the Elbphilharmonie’s unique features: the huge windows. Our guide Theresa explains the special features of the glistening window profiles.

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  • 03. The seats in the Grand Hall

    This virtual tour takes you directly into the Elbphilharmonie Grand Hall: guide Sabina explains everything there is to know about the seating!

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  • 04. The wayfinding system

    It helps people find their way around the building, and is good to look at as well: the Elbphilharmonie’s wayfinding system. Our guide Brigitta Graf explains what makes it special.

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  • 05. The suspension elements in the Grand Hall

    In order to achieve perfectly isolated acoustics, the Grand Hall is completely uncoupled from the rest of the building using special steel springs. Our guide Simon takes us into the gap.

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  • 06. The Foyer of the Recital Hall

    Dark wood and black marble are the distinctive elements used in the foyer of the Recital Hall. Our guide Yolanda expains what makes these materials so special.

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  • 07. The loggias

    The loggias in the facade are one of the Elbphilharmonie's eye-catchers. Our guide Sabina explains how they fit into the building's overall concept.

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  • 08. The globe lights

    Different models of globe light can be found at a wide variety of locations in the Elbphilharmonie. Our guide Brigitta tells us what the architects had in mind.

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  • 09. The wood panelling in the Recital Hall

    250 cubic metres of French oak make the Recital Hall a pleasure to look at and touch. Our guide Sabina explains how the special moulding of the panels affects the acoustics.

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  • 10. The white skin

    It's the source of the Grand Hall's unique acoustics: our guide Simon tells you everything you need to know about the White Skin.

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  • 11. The Green Room

    The Green Room – that mysterious place between backstage and the foyer. What is it there for, and where does it get the colourful name from? Our guide Janina explains.

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  • 12. The half-portal cranes

    It's true that the three half-portal cranes on the south flank of the Elbphilharmonie no longer have any practical function – but they are one of the most impressive memorials to the building's original use.

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  • 13. The artists' dressing rooms

    What do the dressing rooms look like where soloists or conductors prepare for the evening's concert? Janina takes you backstage in this episode of our virtual tours.

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  • 14. The yellow boots

    They are the eye-catcher at the entrance to the Elbphilharmonie. Guide Thomas explains the origin and the significance of the ominous yellow rubber boots.

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  • 15. The mounts for the instruments

    The Elbphilharmonie's backstage area is not only attractive, it's also practical. The best example are the mounts for the instruments behind the stage.

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  • 16. The toilets

    Nothing is left to chance in the Elbphilharmonie – and that means that the toilets are an absolute eye-catcher too. Guide Dorothee tells us all about the special materials used.

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  • 17. The facade

    The glass facade is the Elbphilharmonie's ultimate eye-catching feature. And it's not only beautiful to look at, it has practical functions as well, as our guide Katharina explains.

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  • 18. The best seats

    This is still one of the most controversial questions about the Grand Hall: which are the best seats? Of course there's no simple answer. But our guide Katharina tries to explain.

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  • 19. The route leading to the hall

    Not only the actual concert hall is an absolute eye-catcher at the each other: the route leading there also has something special to offer.

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  • 20. The reflector

    In this episode, guide Katharina explains the huge sound reflector in the Grand Hall.

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  • 21. The facade elements

    The Elbphilharmonie facade is an absolute eye-catcher. But what it is actually made of?

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  • 22. The lighting concept

    The Elbphilharmonie is flooded with light. And that's not only due to the huge window surfaces – the rest of the lighting design also follows a carefully thought-out concept. Guide Gabriele explains!

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  • 23. The lines of sight

    Keine rechten Winkel und der mittig sitzende Saal sorgen in den Foyers der Elbphilharmonie immer wieder zu beeindruckenden Aussichten.

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  • 24. Patrons and Sponsors

    The Elbphilharmonie would never have become reality without its patrons and sponsors. Our guide Gabriele shows where tribute is paid to them in the foyers.

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The Laeiszhalle – All the episodes

  • 1. The Laeiszhalle

    No, there's not just one big classical concert hall in Hamburg. In addition to the Elbphilharmonie, the Laeiszhalle with its three wonderful halls and its fine neo-Baroque architecture is likewise one of Germany's best concert halls.

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  • 2. The Great Hall

    With just over 2,000 seats, the Grand Hall in the Laeiszhalle is roughly the same size as its opposite number in the Elbphilharmonie. What it lacks in terms of the latest technology, it more than makes up with its history. Our guide Sabine explains.

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  • 3. The Recital Hall

    The Recital Hall in the Laeiszhalle can look back on a changeable history. Original a smaller equivalent of the Grand Hall, it was used as a radio studio for a while, and is a showpiece of 1950s architecture today.

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  • 4. The Brahms Foyer

    Johannes Brahms sits majestically on his throne in the big foyer of the Laeiszhalle, with his Muses dancing around him. What else is there to know about this room? Our guide Sabine explains.

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More stories

The Elbphilharmonie reopens for the 2020/21 season The Elbphilharmonie reopens for the 2020/21 season

The Elbphilharmonie reopens for the 2020/21 season

At last – concerts again! An uplifting start to the new season – impressions and voices now on video.

Welcome back to the Laeiszhalle! Welcome back to the Laeiszhalle!

Welcome back to the Laeiszhalle!

The neo-baroque concert hall invites visitors to great moments in music again – with Mozart, Beethoven and Vivaldi.